Thomas Homer-Dixon

37 results found for: Energy


December 7th, 2015 —

The False Promise of Climate Adaptation

Climate skeptics may not be out for the count, but they’re definitely on the ropes. As Earth’s atmosphere warms and severe droughts, storms, and wildfires sweep the planet, those arguing that climate change isn’t a grave danger have had to bob and weave to stay on their feet.

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August 28th, 2015 —

Complexity Science

Homer-Dixon, Thomas, “Complexity Science,” Oxford Leadership Journal, January 2011, 2(1). An article based on the Canada School of Public Service’s 2010 John L. Manion Lecture, entitled “Complexity, Crisis and Change: Implications for the Federal Public Service.” “Complexity science isn’t a fad. I will offer a brief survey of some core concepts and ideas, and I […]

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August 28th, 2015 —

Synchronous Failure: The Emerging Causal Architecture of Global Crisis

Synchronous Failure: The Emerging Causal Architecture of Global Crisis with Brian Walker, Reinette Biggs, Anne-Sophie Crépin, Carl Folke, Eric F. Lambin, Garry D. Peterson, Johan Rockström, Marten Scheffer, Will Steffen,  and Max Troell Ecology and Society 2015, 20(3): 6. Recent global crises reveal an emerging pattern of causation that could increasingly characterize the birth and […]

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June 10th, 2015 —

Scientists Call for an Oil Sands Moratorium

Consensus statement says the science is clear: there can be no more oils sands development if we are to solve the global climate crisis. More than 100 prominent scientists from across North America, including climate scientists, economists, geophysicists, and biologists, released a consensus statement entitled “Ten Reasons for a Moratorium” that shows why Canada and […]

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August 6th, 2014 —

Consider the Global Impacts of Oil Pipelines

Nature, Comment As scientists spanning diverse disciplines, we urge North American leaders to take a step back: no new oil-sands projects should move forward unless developments are consistent with national and international commitments to reducing carbon pollution. Anything less demonstrates flawed policies and failed leadership. Go to: Consider the Global Impacts of Oil Pipelines.

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December 20th, 2013 —

Seeing Past the Fracking Hype

Toronto Globe and Mail, December 20, 2013 For years, NASA has produced a composite photograph of North America at night. Taken by satellite, the photo shows huge patches of light marking New York, Los Angeles, and Toronto. Smaller patches mark cities like Denver, Seattle, and Calgary. Recently something strange has appeared in this image. Another […]

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July 11th, 2013 —

No Trains, No Keystone XL?

The Lac- Mégantic tragedy will make large-scale rail shipment of oil products far less acceptable to the public in both Canada and the US. So the main alternative to Keystone XL that the State Department has identified is unlikely to be available at anything like the scale needed. If so, the pipeline’s approval would enable expansion of oil sands’ extraction that wouldn’t otherwise occur, and it would therefore lead to a large net increase in the oil sands’ carbon emissions—violating President Obama’s main criterion for approving the project.

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June 3rd, 2013 —

Oil Sands Debate

Resolved: The oil sands industry is distorting Canada’s economy and eroding its democracy in ways that will exact an enormous cost on our society over the long term.   THOMAS HOMER-DIXON How the oil sands industry is distorting Canada’s democracy and economy By 2030, Canada’s output from the oil sands will reach about five million […]

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April 1st, 2013 —

The Tar Sands Disaster

President Obama rejected the pipeline last year but now must decide whether to approve a new proposal from TransCanada, the pipeline company. Saying no won’t stop tar sands development by itself, because producers are busy looking for other export routes — west across the Rockies to the Pacific Coast, east to Quebec, or south by rail to the United States. Each alternative faces political, technical or economic challenges as opponents fight to make the industry unviable.

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March 19th, 2013 —

Video: “The Coming Energy Transition: Shock, Innovation, and Resilience”

Talk at the Andrews Initiative, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, N.B.  View the presentation.

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