Thomas Homer-Dixon

23 results found for: Connectivity


August 28th, 2015 —

Complexity Science

Homer-Dixon, Thomas, “Complexity Science,” Oxford Leadership Journal, January 2011, 2(1). An article based on the Canada School of Public Service’s 2010 John L. Manion Lecture, entitled “Complexity, Crisis and Change: Implications for the Federal Public Service.” “Complexity science isn’t a fad. I will offer a brief survey of some core concepts and ideas, and I [...]

Read more »


August 28th, 2015 —

Synchronous Failure: The Emerging Causal Architecture of Global Crisis

Synchronous Failure: The Emerging Causal Architecture of Global Crisis with Brian Walker, Reinette Biggs, Anne-Sophie Crépin, Carl Folke, Eric F. Lambin, Garry D. Peterson, Johan Rockström, Marten Scheffer, Will Steffen,  and Max Troell Ecology and Society 2015, 20(3): 6. Recent global crises reveal an emerging pattern of causation that could increasingly characterize the birth and [...]

Read more »


November 15th, 2014 —

Today’s Butterfly Effect Is Tomorrow’s Trouble

Around the world, national institutions and political systems are designed to deal with single-cause problems and incremental and reversible change. But the world ain’t like that any more. Take a problem like climate change. Its causes are many and tangled; the climate system has flipped from one state to another in the past, and could do so again under human pressure; and once it flips, we won’t be able to get the old climate back.

Read more »


September 19th, 2010 —

Podcast: Risk, uncertainty and transformation in a time of crisis

September 19th, 2010, interview with Eric Paglia of Think Globally Radio, Stockholm, Sweden, on “Risk, uncertainty, and transformation in a time of crisis.”

Read more »


May 5th, 2010 —

Complexity Science and Public Policy

On May 5, 2010, I had the honour of giving the Manion Lecture for the Canada School of Public Service, in Ottawa, Canada. The article is a revised text of the lecture, titled “Complexity Science and Public Policy.”

Read more »


June 8th, 2009 —

The Great Transformation: Climate Change as Cultural Change

A speech to a conference in Essen, Germany. I’m delighted to be here with you this evening, in part because this is my first visit to the Ruhr. This region has an extraordinary history as a crucible of an industrial revolution that was, of course, powered by coal. And coal is a substance that will [...]

Read more »


June 8th, 2009 —

Podcast: Speech to a conference on “The Great Transformation: Climate Change and Cultural Change” (part 1 of 2)

On June 8, 2009, I gave a speech to a conference in Essen, Germany on “The Great Transformation: Climate Change as Cultural Change,” in which I identified the cognitive, economic, political, and normative components of the coming cultural transformation arising from climate change.

Read more »


June 8th, 2009 —

Podcast: Speech to a conference on “The Great Transformation: Climate Change and Cultural Change” (part 2 of 2)

On June 8, 2009, I gave a speech to a conference in Essen, Germany on “The Great Transformation: Climate Change as Cultural Change,” in which I identified the cognitive, economic, political, and normative components of the coming cultural transformation arising from climate change.

Read more »


March 24th, 2009 —

Podcast: Terrence McNally interview with Thomas Homer-Dixon on his book, The Upside of Down

In 2006, Thomas Homer-Dixon, author of Canada’s #1 bestseller, The Upside of Down, wrote, “September 11th and Katrina won’t be the last time we walk out of our cities.” Whether from economic collapse, terrorism, climate change, pandemic, energy scarcity, or the widening gap between rich and poor, he believes breakdown is inevitable. And if we [...]

Read more »


March 24th, 2009 —

Terrence McNally Interviewed Thomas Homer-Dixon about His Book ‘The Upside of Down’

Interview with Terrence McNally, Pacifica Radio in Los Angeles, California In 2006, THOMAS HOMER DIXON, author of Canada’s #1 bestseller, THE UPSIDE OF DOWN, wrote, “September 11th and Katrina won’t be the last time we walk out of our cities.” Whether from economic collapse, terrorism, climate change, pandemic, energy scarcity, or the widening gap between [...]

Read more »


« Next Page of Results
Print Friendly