Thomas Homer-Dixon

8 results found for: Climate Skeptics


August 6th, 2014 —

The Conceptual Structure of Social Disputes: Cognitive-Affective Maps as a Tool for Conflict Analysis and Resolution

SAGEOpen (January-March 2014): 1-20. Co-authored with Manjana Milkoreit, Steven Mock, Tobias Schröder, and Paul Thagard. We describe and illustrate a new method of graphically diagramming disputants’ points of view called cognitive-affective mapping. The products of this method—cognitive-affective maps (CAMs)—represent an individual’s concepts and beliefs about a particular subject, such as another individual or group or [...]

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October 7th, 2013 —

Climate Uncertainty Shouldn’t Mean Inaction

People who argue for inaction on climate change are betting that the vast majority of climate scientists are wrong. The balance of evidence is decisively against them.

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April 1st, 2013 —

The Tar Sands Disaster

President Obama rejected the pipeline last year but now must decide whether to approve a new proposal from TransCanada, the pipeline company. Saying no won’t stop tar sands development by itself, because producers are busy looking for other export routes — west across the Rockies to the Pacific Coast, east to Quebec, or south by rail to the United States. Each alternative faces political, technical or economic challenges as opponents fight to make the industry unviable.

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July 24th, 2012 —

Climate Change’s Costs Hit the Plate

People may not care much about climate change, but most do care about the price of food because it affects their everyday lives. Fears about imperiled food security may be our best hope for breaking through widespread climate-change denial and generating the political pressure to do something, finally, about the problem.

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December 31st, 2010 —

And Now the Weather: Nasty and Brutish

On December 31, 2010, in “And Now the Weather: Nasty and Brutish,” published in the Toronto Globe and Mail, I report the results of some recent climate research that suggests loss of Arctic sea ice is disrupting the polar vortex, causing north-south jet streams to pull cold air into southern latitudes.

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December 4th, 2009 —

Responding to the Skeptics

On December 7, 2009, in “Responding to the Skeptics,” published in the Toronto Globe and Mail, Andrew Weaver of the University of Victoria and I offer short refutations of four arguments commonly used to raise doubts about the scientific consensus on climate change.

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February 16th, 2004 —

Cold Truths About Global Warming

By February, Canadians’ love of fresh snow and winter sports has given way to annoyance, as we shovel our driveways for the umpteenth time. This winter, we’ve had some particularly nasty weather. But far colder and much nastier winters could be in store for us, especially for eastern Canadians and perhaps very soon. The culprit, weirdly enough, could be global warming.

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November 25th, 2002 —

Response to Baliunas et al.

Baliunas and her colleagues make a series of arguments that have been heard frequently –especially from Baliunas – over many years of debate about global warming. Other climate scientists have taken these arguments seriously, addressed them, and, for the most part, found them unconvincing. In their recent article, these authors also misread and sometimes wildly misrepresent key scientific evidence on climate change.

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